Character Coalition Puts a Compelling Case to the AUPIHP

Character Coalition team getting ready to present to the AUPIHP

The team getting ready to present from left Bill Rayner, Miriam Dunningham, Alex Dempsey, Angus McKenzie and Jennifer Hayman

The Character Coalition Team presented for over 3 hours to the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel on June 16 2015.

The professional and well researched submission ranged over all the points the Character Coalition has been pushing for the last four years.

Malcolm Middleton gave a superb presentation about the positive effects of demolition controls in Brisbane.

You can read the presentations that we have available by clicking on the (underlined) links below;

Alex Dempsey – Co Chair Character Coalition
Angus McKenzie (Planning evidence)
Jennifer Hayman (Heritage consultant)
Malcolm Middleton (Architect, Brisbane)
New Lynn Protection Society – Penny Laybourn
North Shore – Bill Raynor (Member of Heritage Advisory Panel)
Parnell Heritage – Julie Hill
Pukekohe – Christine Madsen
Remuera Heritage – Sue Cooper
Rob Enright (Legal submissions)
Save Our St Heliers – Miriam Dunningham

Why does protecting character in the Unitary Plan matter to the Coalition?

It matters to us because our members value how retaining the established character of their places affects their environment – it tells the story of how their places came to be , it’s the history visible in the built fabric, it exists all over the region , and It is a finite resource.

Malcolm Middleton gave a superb presentation about the positive effects of demolition controls in Brisbane

Malcolm Middleton gave a superb presentation about the positive effects of demolition controls in Brisbane
Picture shows him presenting to the panel with our Counsel Rob Enright.

They think this resource needs good protection and management because it’s not just wood and bricks and mortar – as the Auckland Plan says, it’s part of our identity, it gives a sense of place, anchoring their connections to their environment and linking them to their past. It’ s worth keeping not just because it’s old, but because it has meaning for people.

That’s not to say our built environment can’t evolve over time – more can be added to the story – but without the proper care and attention in the regulations governing retention, replacement builds and the like, our legacy of built character will be chopped up, its collective values degraded or obliterated.

But this is the opportunity to get it right, to make a step change so the patterns of the past are not repeated. We’ve seen their effects in the loss of many buildings that should, even in the present rules framework, still be here.

If we don’t want this type of thing to keep happening, we must build a strong regulatory framework which is focused on better outcomes. That is what we are fighting for.